Five Qualities To Look Out For In A Good Talent

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Talent Management System at Cognition Global Concepts.

Who is a great talent? What do talent managers and Human Capital Professionals look for when hiring or developing Great Talents?

In this blog, I’m going to let you in on whom I believe great talents are and why. After reading this article, you will be clear about the five key attributes in talent management for managing great talents in your organization.

During my days in active employment, I dreaded the phrase “great talent” – partly because the parameter for determining a good talent can be vaguely decided. A talent manager could put the worse employee up for promotion for selfish reasons while neglecting a talent with potentials for greatness.

In working as coach and trainer for successful entrepreneurs and organizations, every company I’ve worked with, every book I’ve read, every research I carried out point to the fact that talent can make or destroy an organization.

I also discovered that there are five key qualities that successful talent managers look for in an individual. There may be more but the following are the top ones in my opinion.

 

The Five Qualities of A Good Talent

1. Competence

For anyone to be considered talented, he or she has to be highly competent in an area that is valuable in the marketplace. They have to have the right skills and ability for what they do best, and possess the information that others are willing to pay for. Talented people are life-long learners; an attribute they leverage to constantly stay ahead of competition. They read good books, listen to CDs, DVDs and podcasts; and many of them have their own personal mentors that keep them accountable.

 

2. Character

It is possible to have one or two “smart people” in an organization, people that go beyond the extra mile to deliver greats results. But if these people are not completely trustworthy, he or she is a great risk and liability to the organization. Therefore, it is absolutely important for successful talent management that employees they hire and retain conduct themselves with complete integrity at all times. They must tell the truth and be transparent in all their dealings.

 

3. Collaboration

In the present information age, people need to be great collaborators to be able to handle the velocity of everyday data within and outside their organizations. Talented individuals work well with others in teams. They engage in knowledge sharing and are willing to swallow their pride to reach group goals and help others succeed.

 

4. Communication

Talented individuals are great communicators but not as you probably think. Excellent communication skill is not in oratory prowess, instead the ability to ask superior questions and listen to the answers. When great individuals communicate, they show curiosity, listen to every word, and look for the meaning and emotions behind the words.

 

5. Commitment

Commitment is important to success and talented people are driven by passion. They do not consider what they’re doing as work, instead as service or fulfillment of higher calling. They have a positive can-do attitude and are willing to go the extra mile regardless the challenge. They focus on absolute importance and discipline to achieve their goals.

 

Individuals, employees or leaders that must be considered as “talented” need to demonstrate the 5Cs above. It implies also that everyone do not need a Cambridge certificate to qualify, but whether you are a Janitor and Managing Director, talent managers can pick you as talented as long as you demonstrate the qualities above.

If you’d like to learn more about talent management or need help improving your employee’s performance, visit Cognition Global Concepts.

 

Nkem Paul is founder and CEO of Cognition Global Concepts. He specializes in helping entrepreneurs and corporate organizations to develop high performance capabilities and build self-sustaining enterprise that doubles productivity and revenue.

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